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23 Dec

2018 in Review: 5 Pakistani films that broke norms this year

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2018 was a brilliant year for cinema in Pakistan and the box office numbers are there to prove it. However, even bigger than the collections this year had to be the fresh narratives that came about on the silver screen.



Whether it was pathbreaking cinema that explored the underbelly of Pakistani nuptials like Load Wedding or films like Cake that talked about familial bonds2018 gave us a list of gems to appreciate.

Here’s our list of the best of what this year had to offer…

 

Motorcycle Girl

 

Exploring the real-life story of Zenith Irfan, Motorcycle Girl broke more norms than any other film this year. From Sohai Ali Abro’s close-to-perfect embodiment of Irfan’s persona to the scenic journey the film makes us a part of, this was surely not a film to miss out on.

The film is now available on Youtube after having a tv premiere.

 

The Donkey King

 

Pakistani animation has never had as much success as it did this year with The Donkey King. Although the film should have marketed to an adult audience instead of children, the film broke quite a few norms by discussing the socio-political fabric like never before.

 

Jawani Phir Nahi Ani 2

 

Becoming the highest grossing film of the industry in its 7-decade history, JPNA 2 really proved its mettle at the box office. It has also proved that filmmakers like Nadeem Baig – who have the masala narrative in mind, have figured out what the audience needs.

 

Teefa in Trouble

 

Another film to work its masala aesthetic, Ali Zafar’s Teefa in Trouble quite easily was the sleeper hit of the year. From its literal item number to the scenic locations in Poland, the film was one for the books and truly proved that despite controversies, the actor could still bring people to the cinemas.

 

Cake

 

 

Hands-down the film that was the epitome of brilliant storytelling in 2018, Cake proved its mettle to the critics and the box office alike. It also proved that budding filmmakers like Asim Abbasi can and are the future of Pakistani cinema.

 

Shahjehan Saleem

The author is Contributing Editor at Something Haute as well as a professor in the Media Sciences department at SZABIST, Karachi. Socio-cultural theories and geography fill up the rest of his time.