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27 Aug

Coke Studio 10: Sajjad Ali, Mekaal Hasan make a brilliant debut as music directors

Coke Studio

It’s heartening to see some of our most established musicians taking on a more responsible role in the latest season of Coke Studio. Musicians like Ali Hamza, Sajjad Ali and Mekaal Hasan have had more of a say in how their expertise is used this year and we have to say that it seems as though this formula is working. Ali Hamza amazed us with his original composition, ‘Tinak Dhin‘ in the last episode and this week was Sajjad Ali and Mekaal Hasan’s turn.

Sajjad Ali made his debut as music director alongside his daughter, Zaw Ali, in a song called ‘Ronay Na Diya‘. While the lyrics were written by Sudharshan Faakir, the music was directed by Sajjad Ali himself. Ali was true to his signature style, which is emotional and romantic, and his daughter made a spectacular musical debut as well. We hope to see the young blood around more often.

The song also pays homage to the exquisite, Malika-e-Ghazal, Begum Akthar.

 

On the other hand, Mekaal Hasan is known for his brilliant original compositions but finally after 10 seasons, we get to see Mekaal Hasan doing what he does best. Giving tribute to Madam Noor Jehan, Hasan covered ‘Mujh Se Pehli Si Muhabbat‘, originally composed and written by Rashid Attre and Faiz Ahmed Faiz. Hasan took a classic ghazal and gave it a contemporary, progressive twist. Paired with the vocals of Humera Channa and Nabeel Shaukat, the song is a treat for the ears.

 

 

Also featured on the episode were Quratulain Baloch and Aima Baig. QB made her appearance alongside Arieb Azhar and Akbar Ali and together they performed a very experimental rendition of ‘Laal Meri Pat‘.

 

 

Aima Baig made her Coke Studio debut alongside Sahir Ali Bagga’s upbeat rendition of  a popular Siraiki song, ‘Baazi‘. Aima Baig did complete justice to the song and proved that she can sing in diverse styles.

 

 

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The Haute Team

This article is written by one of our competent team members, who probably didn't have enough to say to own up to it.