To top
4 Dec

Karan Johar apologizes for item songs, Hamza Ali Abbasi approves

In a recent interview, Bollywood’s ace filmmaker Karan Johar, has apologized for the item songs his films have been known for, and it’s none other than Hamza Ali Abbasi who wholeheartedly approves of this statement.

“The moment you put a woman in the center and a thousand men looking at her lustingly, it’s setting the wrong example. As a film maker I have made those mistakes and I will never do it again,” Karan said, speaking to SheThePeople.

Hamza Ali Abbasi took to Twitter to share Johar’s interview and wrote, “When i spoke against ITEM NUMBERS our desi MODERNATIES lashed at me calling me a wannabe Mullah… Now i hope at least this guys views will help explaining why it’s not ok to use a woman’s sexual appeal to sell films. Hope we can focus on art & reject shameful trends like item nos”

 

Not long ago Hamza condemned item numbers via social media. “Item songs degrade women and objectify them….which goes against the essence of Women’s Empowerment and Women’s Rights, our religion and our norms,” read his status.

 

Its heart breaking and disappointing to see some brilliant Pakistani film makers still using ITEM NUMBERS to sell their…

Posted by Hamza Ali Abbasi on Sonntag, 23. Juli 2017

 

While Hamza has been a proud advocate of the ‘no- item songs’ claim, this coming from Karan Johar comes as quite a pleasant surprise. K-Jo has been the man who has produced hit songs like ‘Chikni Chameli’, ‘Mera Naam Mary Hai’ and many more, and his films are known for their exaggerated portrayal of love.

In the same interview, Karan also explained “When you show a man chasing a woman, it seems like it’s all so passionate in love but it could amount to stalking. When you show a man being abusive to a woman, you think he is being angry but no, he is being wrong. Things you show on celluloid sometimes set a template. So we as film makers need to be very responsible.”

 

 

 

 

 

The Haute Team

This article is written by one of our competent team members, who probably didn't have enough to say to own up to it.